We’re living in a time that … everybody wants to see failure. They want to see people knocked off the hill. You can’t have a television show without a competition because they want to see who cries this week and who goes downhill, who gets kicked out. We don’t need one show about cupcakes, as far as I’m concerned, but you know what, if you want one — okay, that’s fine. Let’s have a show about cupcakes. But does it have to be a fucking competition? Do you have to have cupcake wars? … I guess I’m just really ready for people to kind of settle down and know each other again and root for each other as opposed to look for the faults in each other. … Life is magical and I guess my thing is I wish that people wanted that magic.
Billy Bob Thornton on Oprah’s Master Class describing society’s desire to see people fail rather than succeed.

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More titles, easier access and quite possibly a saving of public funds. Why wouldn’t we simply junk the physical libraries and purchase an Amazon Kindle Unlimited subscription for the entire country?

Close The Libraries And Buy Everyone An Amazon Kindle Unlimited Subscription (via infoneer-pulse)

I laughed, thinking this was an article from The Onion… but leave it to Forbes. I’ll still not completely convinced this isn’t just poorly done satire.

What a ridiculous, stupid, completely insane capitalist-loving idea.


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I don’t mind getting smacked on the chin. I just don’t want to get nibbled to death. There’s a difference.
John Steinbeck, In Dubious Battle

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God among men Nick Cave is the subject of 20,000 Days on Earth, a reality-bending documentary that portrays a somewhat fictitious 24-hour period in his life.

Not hip to what Nick Cave’s all about? Shame on you. But really, here’s your crash course on all things Nick Cave:


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Spent a day cleaning out my grandfather’s old camp in Ohio and came across some of these old gems of mine from the early-90s. Oh, sweet sweet childhood.

Spent a day cleaning out my grandfather’s old camp in Ohio and came across some of these old gems of mine from the early-90s. Oh, sweet sweet childhood.


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I hope that yesterday you all remembered the true meaning of the 4th and kept close to your hearts the male-dominating, slave-owning, tax-hating, genocidal, homicidal vision our founding fathers had others fight so bravely for. 🇺🇸🎉🎈


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Everybody gets told to write about what they know. The trouble with many of us is that at the earlier stages of life we think we know everything - or to put it more usefully, we are often unaware of the scope and structure of our ignorance.
Thomas Pynchon, Slow Learner

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What goes around may come around, but it never ends up exactly the same place, you ever notice? Like a record on a turntable, all it takes is one groove’s difference and the universe can be on into a whole ‘nother song.
Thomas Pynchon, Inherent Vice

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dudeedu:

I am looking for the feedback of those in #education. How happy are you with your commute? Do you live too far or too close to school? Do you live in the same community you teach in? Why did you choose to live where you did?

I am looking to relocate for my new job and am debating…

I have a roughly 45 minute drive each way. While I enjoy my job, I do not desire to live in the small, conservative, rural town in which I teach. I enjoy and need that time both in the morning and after school.

That’s 90 minutes of driving each school day. Multiply that by our 185 work days and that’s 277.5 hours of driving each school year. If the average audiobook is 14 hours, that’s almost 20 extra books that I can read each year, simply driving to and from work (I actually use this as an example is my economics class on how to use one’s time efficiently). I also listen to my numerous podcasts or NPR’s Morning Edition on the way.

To answer the question then, my commute is good.


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A few days of sleeping, reading, and writing and I’m feeling better… despite having the beard growing capabilities of a 14 year old.

A few days of sleeping, reading, and writing and I’m feeling better… despite having the beard growing capabilities of a 14 year old.


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[White supremacists] developed a vocabulary of obstruction that remains very much with us today, a lexicon that relies strongly on claims to liberty (as opposed to equality) and states’ rights (as opposed to federal regulation) and freedom of association (as opposed to inclusiveness). Opponents of the Civil Rights Act warned that its implementation would further empower an already tyrannical federal government … They depicted it as snatching freedom from white business owners in order to propitiate lawless blacks by securing them preferential treatment - the precursor to recent arguments about ‘reverse discrimination.’ …

To express the judgment that African Americans were inferior and that white people needed to be protected from their contaminating presence, black people were consigned to the back of the bus, directed to use distinct drinking fountains and telephone booths, excluded altogether from white schools and hospitals, permitted to visit zoos and museums only on certain days, confined to designated areas in courtrooms, and sworn in as witnesses using racially differentiated Bibles. Under segregation, white people routinely declined to bestow courtesy titles such as ‘Mr.’ or ‘Mrs.’ on black people, referring to them simply as ‘boy’ or ‘girl,’ regardless of age. Stores prohibited African Americans from trying on clothes before purchase. Telephone directories marked black residents by placing “col” (for colored) in parentheses next to their names. Newspapers refused to carry notices for black weddings.

Of these inequities, few were more galling than the ones my parents anticipated on those trips to the South: the exclusion of black people from places of amusement and relaxation and facilities for eating and sleeping.

"The Civil Rights Act’s Unsung Victory" by Randall Kennedy, American Law professor at Harvard University

This month’s Harper’s has an absolutely mind-blowing article about Mr. Kennedy’s childhood trips from Washington, D.C. to his birthplace of Columbia, South Carolina during the early 1960s.

The majority of Americans learn about the various sit-ins and Freedom Rides and marches throughout the 50s and 60s, but most who never firsthand witnessed the black experience in the south only a generation ago underestimate the grip that white supremacy had over the nation at the time - and which, of course, it still does.

You should already be subscribed to Harper’s anyway, but if you aren’t, this article alone is worth the subscription fee.


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Golfing in the mountains of Virginia. Not a bad view now that the fog lifted.

Golfing in the mountains of Virginia. Not a bad view now that the fog lifted.


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I am supposing, or perhaps only hoping, that our future may be found in the past’s fugitive moments of compassion rather than in its solid centuries of warfare.
Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States

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Websites I despise: The Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, & Upworthy. This click-bait mentality of the internet is really, really getting tiresome and its bleeding over into so-called venues of journalism.

Seriously, look at the front page of CNN right now and you’ll see the following stories: “Miley Cyrus: I didn’t overdose on drugs,” “Bradley Cooper looks different now,” and “She filmed herself having an abortion.”

What the fuck is this, CNN? You’re not evening trying to be a source of serious journalism anymore.

Then again, CNN is still the same shit news organization that invites climate change deniers (who say they are not deniers) on terrible shows like Crossfire to argue with Bill Nye (see today’s video) as if the argument among scientists wasn’t already settled overwhelmingly years ago.


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